More on Allspice
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Allspice Berry

Pimenta Officinalis (Family, Myrtaceae)

Its spicy scent often used in potpourris, and used to flavor beverages, sweets and other foods. warming, cheering, sense enhancing. Warning Avoid use in Sun. AKA P. dioica.

Marcia Elston Contributes

I see in Sylla's Reference Manual, it has been tested at low dose non-toxic,non-irritant, non-sensitising, non-phototoxic; local dilute application works well. DERMAL IRRITANT; Avoid in PREGNANCY. I also see in Allured's EO's 1981-87, in a 1976 GC-MS, a water essence of pimento berry was found to contain: 1,8-cineole (5%), linalool (0.4%), a-terpineol (1.2%), terpinen-4-ol (2.0%), geranyl acetate (0.3%), geraniol (0.4%), eugenol (80%) and methyl eugenol.

Synonyms: Pimento, pimenta, Jamaica pepper.

General Description of Plant: An evergreen tree which reaches about 10 metres high and begins to produce fruit in its third year. A tender, aromatic tree with thin, oblong-elliptic, leathery leaves. Small white flowers are borne in panicles up to 5 inches in spring and summer, followed by dark grown, globose berries about 1/4 inch in diameter. Each fruit contains two kidney-shaped green seeds which turn glossy black upon ripening. Indigenous to the West Indies and South America, it is cultivated extensively in Jamaica, Cuba and, to a lesser degree, in Central America. Imported berries are distilled in Europe and America. Four other varieties of pimento are found in Venezuela, Guyana and the West Indies which are used locally as spices. Given the name "allspice" by John Ray (1627-1705), and English botanist who likened their flavor to a combination of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. Trees are grown in plantations in Jamaica, known as "pimento walks" which fill the air with scent during the flowering season.

Essential oil by steam distillation from l. the leaves, and 2. the fruit. The green unripe berries contain more oil than the ripe berries, but the largest percentage of oil is contained in the shell of the fruit. An

oleoresin from the berries is also produced in small quanatities. 1. Pimenta leaf oil is a yellowish-red or brownish liquid with a powerful sweet-spicy scent, similar to cloves. 2. Pimenta berry oil is a pale yellow liquid with a sweet warm balsamic-spicy bodynote (middle) and fresh, clean top note. It blends well with geranium, lavender, opopanax, labdanum, ylang ylang, patchouli, neroli, oriental and spicy bases.

Aromatherapy uses: CIRCULATION, MUSCLES & JOINTS: Arthritis, fatigue, muscle cramp, rheumatism, stiffness, etc. "Used in TINY amounts in a massage oil for chest infections, for severe muscle spasm to restore mobility quickly, or where extreme cold is experienced." (1) RESPIRATORY SYSTEM: Chills, congested coughts, bronchitis, DIGESTIVE SYSTEM: Cramp, flatulence, indigestion, nausea, NERVOUS SYTEM: Depression, nervous exhaustion, neuralgia, tension and stress.

(1) Davis, P. London School of Aromatherapy notes, 1983

Other sources: Herb Society of America Herbs & Their Uses, Deni Brown, The Complete Medicinal Herbal, Penelope Ody.

Marcia Elston Samara Botane Seattle, WA

http://www.wingedseed.com/samara/


Susan Changes@sunlink.net contributes

The leaf and berry both contain eugenol a dermal irritant. This also means it could be used as a counter irritant. This may make it useful in situations where a counter irritant may be beneficial, i.e., used for sore muscles (used LOCALLY only and in low dilutions) and also for poor circulation in some conditions. One must weigh the risks and benefits of any eo, including this one, when applying to open skin (which I would personally caution against) Should avoid with pregnancy. Because of the eugenol content (and perhaps others I'm not familiar with) it could also be beneficial as an anesthetic (relieving pain) from neuralgia, herpes, shingles ... the oil also has some antiseptic properties. Could be useful in blends for arthritic conditions. Due to its said "uplifting" qualities, it might be good for someone who is depressed.

I GO ON RECORD RIGHT HERE AND NOW (YES, EXCUSE ME PLEASE FOR SHOUTING) THAT WHEN TREATING ANY CONDITION OF A HUMAN BEING, BE IT PSYCHOLOGICAL, MENTAL, EMOTIONAL, PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL, OR EVEN THE ENVIRONMENT IN WHICH THAT HUMAN LIVES, ALLL THESE THINGS SHOULD BE CONSIDERED IN THE TREATMENT OF THAT PERSON. ESSENTIAL OILS CAN BE A USEFUL ADJUNCT TO A TOTAL, HOLISTIC, APPROACH AND I DO NOT CONDON THE USE OF AROMATHERAPY ALONE AS ANY TYPE OF THERAPY, HOWEVER INSIGNIFICANT THE PROBLEM MAY SEEM.

"Health, in my humble opinion, is the balanced, haromonious RELATIONSHIP between the body, mind, emotions, spirit and the environment in a world that is constantly changing." Health is relational to everything and a contant changing *process* NOT a static state of being.

There's my contribution.... next ...... Oh yes ... please do not consider this as advice or recommendation. I do not prescribe ... only meant to educate. It is up to you to learn more about this oil before using.

Wishing you all Health, Hope, Joy and Healing,
Susan Changes@sunlink.net


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